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Thursday, 31 January 2013

An Update: The Best Books on Aging

blogging bug image It's hard for me to keep up with the housekeeping around this blog, but four-and-a-half years is a bit much even for my lazy ass. Imagine if I hadn't dusted the house in that long?

But that's what it's been since I last updated the Best Books on Aging section over there at the top of TGB Features on the right sidebar.

Actually, it's worse that that. Today's is the first update ever as I haven't touched the page since it was first posted in August of 2008. Oh well. Better now than never.

The prompt to do this arrived as a result over the past weeks of a succession of “comments” from several writers on the book page linking to their books as if Time Goes By is an advertising and marketing website free to one and all.

It is not. They have been removed along with all other comments that have accumulated since the section was launched and I have now permanently shut down comments on that page.

By their generally accepted nature, best-of lists are selective. (What good are they if they're not?) And by my personal nature, I'm an extremely tough critic so this list – chosen from several hundred books about aging I've read in the past 20 years – totals just 17, including the newly added ones.

As noted, readers will no longer be able to add books in the comments. Everyone is always welcome to suggest additional books via email (click “contact” in the upper left corner of all pages) but since it has been so long since the last update, I wouldn't hold my breath if I were you. And, of course, I reserve the right to reject suggestions that don't meet my standards for best.

So, you can click on the title of the section in the right sidebar or click here to see the update with some notes from me and quotations. Here is a list of the newly added books:

The Art of Aging, A Doctor's Prescription for Well-Being by Sherwin B. Nuland

The Creative Age: Awakening Human Potential in the Second Half of Life by Gene D. Cohen, M.D.

The Long History of Old Age edited by Pat Thane

My Twice-Lived Life by Donald M. Murray

Old Age by Simone de Beauvoir

Old Age: Journey into Simplicity by Helen M Luke

Somewhere Toward the End, A Memoir by Diana Athill

Still Here: Embracing Aging, Changing, and Dying by Ram Dass

Travels with Epicurus, A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life by Daniel Klein


At The Elder Storytelling Place today, Dolores Banerd: Shock and Awe


Posted by Ronni Bennett at 05:30 AM | Permalink | Email this post

Comments

Just noticed a typo in your updates--2nd entry should be Cohen

Once again you have done reconnaissance for the rest of us. You have given us overviews and nuggets valuable in themselves (e.g. Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi's " spiritually radiant"), as well as giving us a roadmap to easily finding them and starting the literary journey with some travel tips (e.g. about Betty Friedan, "Hard going to read, but rewarding for the effort." Thank you.

Now I am off on the first leg of the journey, to see if any are now available for kindle.

Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge on the subject that I am living - aging. It is helpful in so many ways. I now know that I am not unique in the physical problems I have and that's just part of the helpful information you, and books you have suggested, have provided me through these last years.

What wonderful titles. Simplicity...all the folks I work with are simplifying their lives. A Twice Lived Life reminds me I am on my third or fourth lived version. And yes, it's a Creative Age indeed if one can get off one's ass and just do it.

Sometimes I succeed.

Thanks for the suggestions.

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