REFLECTIONS: On Racism in America
ELDER MUSIC: Trains

Vintage TGB: 17 September 2004

[Each Saturday, a past story from the Time Goes By archive is published here. They correspond to a date of approximately five years ago – sometimes updated, sometimes not. Updates are noted with strikethroughs.]

Think on These

The great thing about a good quote is that it is larger than the sum of its parts; it leaves much room for personal interpretation and long rumination leading who knows where – an adventure of the mind.

These and many more have been collected, a few at a time, in a file on my computer for years. I have hundreds of them, some better than others and vice versa. Although favorites change now and again, here are a few, for your weekend rumination, that currently speak to me. What about you?

“The hardest years of life are those between ten and seventy.”
      - Helen Hayes (at age 73)

“How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?”
      - Satchel Paige

“Old age is like everything else. To make a success of it, you’ve got to start young.”
      - Fred Astaire

“One of the many things nobody ever tells you about middle age is that it’s such a nice change from being young.”
      - Dorothy Canfield Fisher

“Youth is a gift of nature, but age is a work of art.”
      - Garson Kanin

“Old age is an excellent time for outrage. My goal is to say or do at least one outrageous thing every week.”
      - Maggie Kuhn

“When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.”
      - Eleanor Roosevelt

“If you associate enough with older people who do enjoy their lives, who are not stored away in any golden ghettos, you will gain a sense of continuity and of the possibility for a full life.”
      - Margaret Mead

“If you take all the experience and judgment of men over 50 out of the world, there wouldn’t be enough left to run it.”
      - Henry Ford

“No wise man ever wished to be younger.”
      - Jonathan Swift

“Being seventy is not a sin.”
      - Golda Meir

“It spite of illness, in spite even of the arch-enemy sorrow, one can remain alive long past the usual date of disintegration if one is unafraid of change, insatiable in intellectual curiosity, interested in big things, and happy in a small way.”
      - Edith Wharton


Comments

My favorite is "Youth is a gift of nature, but age is a work of art". by Garson Kanin.

I also like the Edith Wharton quote at the end. I believe all the things she mentions apply to me.

I love quotes, thanks for sharing these. My very favorite is "If I had my life to live over, I'd pick more daisies."

Hubby read a book about Yogi Berra last week and read the many quotes to me. We both laughed all weekend.

Edith Wharton is the winner!

Love the quotes, thanks for sharing. The one with most impact is from Eleanor Roosevelt. I placed a photo of my husband above the Edith Wharton quote and have it on our refrigerator. He has a wide open, teeth showing smile on his face and I like to look at it.

It spite of illness, in spite even of the arch-enemy sorrow, one can remain alive long past the usual date of disintegration if one is unafraid of change, insatiable in intellectual curiosity, interested in big things, and happy in a small way.”
- Edith Wharton


My favorite. This one is a "keeper"

Not to brag but I think I measure up to Edith Wharton's tips.

All worth pondering and implementing. Thank you!
XO
WWW

I like Paige and Astaire!


Ronni,

I have no idea whose quotes these are but I love them.

"I have only one wrinkle and I'm sitting on it."

and

"To me,old age is always fifteen years older than I am."


What food for thought!

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