INTERESTING STUFF – 23 February 2019
Crabby Old Lady: Professional Patient

ELDER MUSIC: 1970 Goes Forth

Tibbles1SM100x130This Sunday Elder Music column was launched in December of 2008. By May of the following year, one commenter, Peter Tibbles, had added so much knowledge and value to my poor attempts at musical presentations that I asked him to take over the column. He's been here each week ever since delighting us with his astonishing grasp of just about everything musical, his humor and sense of fun. You can read Peter's bio here and find links to all his columns here.

* * *

I spent much of 1970 in the San Francisco bay area, initially in Berkeley, and later in Palo Alto and Los Gatos. I got to see and hear a lot of live music that year, at the Fillmore, Winterland, the Family Dog and elsewhere possibly to the long term detriment to my hearing.

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL were generally underrated by critics at the time, but the general public loved them.

Creedence

Their songs and records have stood the test of time,so once again, the public knew something that the critics didn’t. Each album they released around this time contained what has proved to be classic songs. Down on the Corner may be one of those from the album “Willy and the Poor Boys”.

♫ Creedence - Down on the Corner


THE KINKS were the most English of the “British Invasions” bands.

Kinks

Their songs, even whole albums, were about the minutiae about English life. One song that bucked that trend was probably their biggest hit: Lola. The song was banned by the BBC, not for the general content of the lyrics, but because the song mentioned Coca Cola. Can’t have brand names on the Beeb.

♫ Kinks - Lola


MICHAEL NESMITH was really the only ex-member of The Monkees who had a decent career separate from that group.

Mike Nesmith

He was even productive before the group was formed – he wrote the terrific song, Different Drum. Afterwards, he formed several country rock groups and recorded a number of well regarded albums.

One of those was “Magnetic South” on which the song Joanne appeared. The song is a real earworm (for me anyway). You have been warned.

♫ Michael Nesmith - Joanne


BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS’ second album produced a number of hits. It was their first without the guiding hand of Al Kooper, who formed the group.

Blood Sweat and Tears

In place of Al, who did most of the singing on that first album, they had the fine baritone David Clayton-Thomas doing the honours. The song And When I Die was written by Laura Nyro and was first recorded by Peter, Paul & Mary. It was also one the hits for BS&T.

♫ Blood Sweat and Tears - And When I Die


1970 saw SIMON & GARFUNKEL at the peak of their creativity.

Simon and Garfunkel

It also saw their swansong with the album “Bridge Over Troubled Water”. The title song was one of the finest ever put on to vinyl. Perversely, I won’t feature that one, but instead here’s El Condor Pasa (If I Could).

Simon and Garfunkel - El Condor Pasa (If I Could)


By 1970, STEVIE WONDER was starting to make a name for himself as an adult performer rather than just as Little Stevie Wonder, as he was initially known.

Stevie Wonder

It was still a couple of years until he would record his masterpiece album “Innervisions”, however, he was producing fine pop songs like Signed Sealed Delivered I'm Yours.

♫ Stevie Wonder - Signed Sealed Delivered I'm Yours


On their second album (“Déjà Vu”), Crosby Stills & Nash brought in Neil Young, because on the first album Steve Stills pretty much played all the instruments and it was agreed that a bit of help would be nice. Naturally, they called the group CROSBY STILLS NASH & YOUNG, but you all know that.

Crosby Stills Nash and Young

The album they recorded was a huge hit as were several of the songs from it, including Teach Your Children. The pedal steel guitar on the song was played by Jerry Garcia.

Crosby Stills Nash & Young - Teach Your Children


After hearing the Staple Singers (or some such group) NORMAN GREENBAUM decided that he could write a gospel song, so he did.

Norman Greenbaum

Naturally, he imbued it with the sounds of the day – heavy, fuzz-tone guitar and drums to the fore, but in spite of that I’ve always liked it. The song is Spirit in the Sky.

♫ Norman Greenbaum - Spirit In The Sky


CHICAGO started out as The Chicago Transit Authority and their first album was under that name. However, the real organization with the same name objected and the group reverted to the reduced moniker.

Chicago

Although somewhat long and self indulgent (it was a double album), a lot of that first record was pretty good. From it we have I'm A Man. This one is typical of the period – heavy wah-wah laced guitar, extended drum solo, a lot of cowbell action, soul-sounding singing. In spite of all that it still sounds good.

♫ Chicago - I'm A Man


By 1970, The Miracles were being billed as SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES, because their main man was the singer, songwriter and producer of the group.

Smokey & ;the Miracles

Not just that group, he did the same for many acts on the Motown label. Smokey was hoping to retire from touring but the success of The Tears of a Clown kept him on the road for another couple of years.

♫ Smokey Robinson - The Tears Of A Clown


MUNGO JERRY was a British group who had an ever changing line up whose one constant was the presence of Ray Dorset.

Mungo Jerry

That’s Ray, third from the left. They had quite a few hits in their home country but only one that really impacted elsewhere. That song is In the Summertime.

♫ Mungo Jerry - In The Summertime



Comments

These were such wonderful musicians, and so the music as well. It was my second coming of age, when I divorced, smoked pot, and a few other things single women discovered about life. Yay!

love all of them, thanks

That was a great decade, wasn't it. As for your hearing, "loud" is the only way to listen to rock. The louder the better. You have to feel it in your bones. I still miss my old stereo with the 3 ft tall speakers that could vibrate the whole house.

I so agree with all the above comments! And Susan reminded me that I want better, louder sound from the computer. Rock n Roll deserves that respect!

And am enormously grateful that fate put me onto this earth so I was a near-perfect age for all the music and life-changing attitudes, not to mention experiences from those "far-out" times.

And you were most fortunate or far-sighted to place yourself in the bay area in the 70s, as I did also, in my mid-late 20s.

Terrific selection today, thank you, and always love your notes of the musician(s). Today was also a time-travel backward with the eclectic outfits and earthy looks of those times.

You went and picked all my favorites today! Thanks, as always, for your great column; I look forward to it every week.

Creedence Clearwater, and Bob Seger are doing their final tours. Several others too. I commented to my other half that All his favorite musicians were retiring and coming to town. We are kind of out of the way down here, but they are all visiting.

It was fun reading and listening to your column. It brought back many memories. I was in San Francisco before you – moved to SF from Paris in 1961 and lived there until 1970. We attended many live concerts too, such as for our honeymoon in June 1967, we attended the Monterey Pop Festival and saw Jimi Hendrix burning his guitar. My husband was a friend of a member of Big Brother and the Holding Company so he saw Janis Joplin several times with them. In those years I also liked the Moody Blues, the Byrds. We attended live concerts every week I think like we saw The Doors live at the Matrix Club in SF, and also Moby Grape, the Jefferson Airplane’s, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Sopwith Camel and Country Joe & the Fish, and many others. In Berkeley we would see folk singers like Ritchie Havens and Joan Baez. I still have LPs of Mungo Jerry and the others – am moving to Nashville and don’t know if I just should give them away, or are they valuable? What a fun column – very nostalgic for me.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)