504 posts categorized "Interesting Stuff"

INTERESTING STUFF – 2 May 2020

EDITORIAL NOTE: Usually I like to have a variety of items in Interesting Stuff on Saturdays but this week a lot of virus-related material turned up. I suppose it makes sense – that is what seems to be on all our minds. At least what we have here today is an assortment within the virus genre. I hope you enjoy.

TWIN DIES 100 YEARS AFTER HIS BROTHER DIED IN 1918 PANDEMIC

My online friend Chuck Nyren sent this item about Philip Kahn, a 100-year old who died of the caronavirus. What makes it news is that with his death, history came around full circle: the 1918 flu killed his twin brother when they were just a few months old.

Here's a video from NBC:

You can read more at The New York Times. I just love it when nature, history or life itself ties up a story in such a nice, neat bow.

PETS CRASH IN-HOME NEWS BROADCASTS

It's happened so frequently now that it is almost a commonplace for pets to crash their TV-star owners when they are broadcasting from home.

This one happened with Tampa Bay weatherman, Paul Dellegatto and his dog, Brody. (How is it, with that name, his pet is not a cat?)

CORONAVIRUS COMEDY

Matt Wuerker is a Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and founding staff member at Politico. On Mondays, he posts a new Punchlines - a video taking a look at the week's political comedy from newspapers, magazines, late night talk shows and various online sources. This one appeared last Monday.

The cartoons go by quickly so you may need to hit pause to read them.

You will find more Matt Wuerker videos here.

HOW THE MONA LISA BECAME SO FAMOUS

Actually, the title on the YouTube video asks instead how the Mona Lisa became so overrated. I'm not qualified to discuss that difference but the video is interesting.

STEP RIGHT UP FOLKS AND GET YOUR OFFICIAL

...White House COVID-19 merch. In this case, it's a COVID-19 commemorative coin available at the unofficial White House Gift Shop:

WHcoin

Lucky you, it's currently discounted at US$100 from US$125. Some have reported that the coin is first-daughter Ivanka's bright idea. You'll find it on this website.

BRAD PITT ON SNL AS DR. ANTHONY FAUCI

On Saturday Night Live last week, actor Brad Pitt made a surprise visit as Dr. Anthony Fauci. Take a look:

Dr. Fauci once told a reporter that he would like Brad Pitt to play in on Saturday Night Live and after the show, Huffpost reported that the doctor was thrilled with Pitt's performance:

”As for Pitt’s jokes, Fauci commented: 'Everything he said on Saturday is what’s going on. He did a pretty good job of putting everything together.'”

I thought so too. Thank TGB reader Trudi Kappel for making sure I saw this.

THIS IS WHAT THE PRESIDENT SPENDS HIS TIME ON

...when he should be working on the pandemic.

From the beginning of his tenure in the White House, Trump has frequently attacked journalists and tried to intimidate them into repeating his lies.

That behavior has accelerated since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here's a response from the Washington Post's media critic, Erik Wemple. It is important for a free press to pay attention to this.

RUSSIAN BALLET AT HOME

Like about half the people on the planet, Russia's professional ballet dancers are stuck at home. Bolshoi veteran Ivan Vasiliev made this video to remind fans to stay home but also remind them that ballet is still around.

More at the Washington Post.

TALKATIVE BABY OTTER

This is the cutest thing. The Youtube page tells us that the otter's owner is Mako and the otter's name is Sakura.

There are many more photos of Sakura at Mako's Twitter feed which, he says, is updated daily.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


A TGB READER STORY: Dinosaur Girl

By Lynn Marler

It was a wealthy junior high (middle) school in the San Francisco Bay Area in the early 1960’s. The popular kids all had the right clothes and straight teeth. Even most of the unpopular kids had the right clothes and good teeth since this was a wealthy area; most of the kids’ dads worked in the Cold War defense contracting industry or were orthodontists or plastic surgeons.

I was not in the popular kids group; once in a while that group of kids who are “almost popular” would lower themselves to speak to me, but the real popular kids at the top, never.

(Oh, the popular guys would hang around outside the cafeteria after lunch every day and “bark” at the least-pretty of us unpopular girls that they considered to be “dogs”, but talk to us? Naw.)

I existed in that shadowy area between unpopular and almost unpopular. My dad made as much money as the other dads who worked for defense contractors, but since dad had too many mistresses in addition to whomever he was married to at the time, there was never money for new school clothes, cars were repossessed, our house was full of broken-down furniture, and so on. So I didn’t have the money to fit in and my oddball personality didn’t help either.

But there was a girl who had it worse than I and the other non-popular kids did. Everybody called her Dinosaur Girl since she carried a toy dinosaur around with her at all times; she absolutely loved dinosaurs.

She’d talk and whisper to it while riding the school bus. Sure, it sounds odd for a 12- or 13-year old to be carrying a toy around and talking to it. But if no one else will talk to a girl because they think she’s weird, because she gets good grades and “girls aren’t supposed to be too smart” and because she doesn’t wear the “right” clothes or have the “right” hair and, most horrific of all, doesn’t seem to care much about her appearance, her dinosaur buddies may be all she has to talk to.

(I don’t remember what kind of dinosaur she usually carried around, but too bad it wasn’t a Tyrannosaurus Rex that came alive and attacked Charlene Cheerleader and Johnny Jock when they picked on her. Because pick on her they did, constantly.)

Looking back on it, it occurs to me that she may have been on the high-functioning end of the Aspergers/Autism Spectrum. Or maybe she wasn’t on that spectrum at all; maybe she was just different from the rest of us.

I do remember that she was completely verbal and got very good grades. I lost track of her after graduating from junior high and she didn’t attend the high school I did.

Maybe she ended up running a section of the Smithsonian or the Metropolitan Museum in New York City. (I wouldn’t be surprised: those good grades she got.)

Or maybe she ended up with a non-career type job but was happy enough spending her time off in the science section of her local library. Or maybe she married a nice guy and had some nice kids that thought it was cool that Mom loved dinosaurs too.

Whatever happened, I hope she’s had a happy adulthood. I hope the hell that the other kids put her through in school is a memory that she’s been able to rise above.

You see, although I never actively picked on her, I’m as guilty as those who did because I never stood up for her either. Being in that shadowy purgatory between “in” and “out” groups, I was afraid to draw any attention to myself. To say that I was *terrified* of the popular kids is only putting it slightly too strong. But that’s only a reason, not an excuse.

So, Dinosaur Girl (and I now say that with all respect - heck, I bet at least those schoolboy jocks enjoyed the Jurassic Park movies), if you should happen to read this, I am sorry ‘till the end of my days that I didn’t stick up for you, so sorry.

And I hope you would approve of the stuffed dolphin I have, even though it’s a mammal.

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[EDITORIAL NOTE: Reader's stories are welcome. If you have not published here or not recently, please read submission instructions. Only one story per email.]


INTERESTING STUFF – 25 April 2020

Hello, everyone. I'm almost finished with my week off from blogging but here's a short episode of Interesting Stuff that turned up. I will be back to regular posting on Monday.

DANCING IN THE MOVIES

Here's something to wake you up on a caronavirus morning. I posted this movie dance compilation several years ago and now it has turned up again. It's worth a second go.

It is the best of a lot of dancing from the movies, edited together with one song. The star of this, I believe, is the video editor.

The music is Footloose by Kenny Loggins. Here is a list of the movie clips that are included:

Dirty Dancing, Flashdance, White Nights, Perfect, Saturday Night Fever, Blue Skies, Pulp Fiction, High Fidelity, Clerks 2, American Pie, Billy Elliot, Footloose, True Lies, Grease, Honey, Phantom of the Opera, Step up, Step up 2, Moonwalker, West Side Story, Moulin Rouge, Mary Poppins, 7 Brides for 7 Brothers, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Strictly Ballroom, Happy Feet, Singing in the Rain, Fame, Fame2009, Save the Last Dance, Mamma Mia, Mask of Zorro, Coyote Ugly, Wild Hogs, Get Smart, Airplane, A Knights Tale, High School Musical and Austin Powers.

THE ALEX AND RONNI SHOW

Even though I was taking last week off from this blog, Alex and I recorded a new episode of The Alex and Ronni Show. It's mostly about the virus – do any of us talk about anything else nowadays?

28 DAYS OF VOLUNTARY FACTORY LOCKDOWN

On 23 March, 43 workers at Braskem America, a factory in southeastern Pennsylvania that makes the raw material, polypropylene, needed to manufacture PPE such as masks and gowns, checked into the job and didn't check out again for 28 days. Here is a local TV report about the voluntary lockdown:

“'We were just happy to be able to help,' Boyce, an operations shift supervisor and a 27-year veteran at Braskem America, told the Washington Post.

“'We’ve been getting messages on social media from nurses, doctors, EMS workers, saying thank you for what we’re doing. But we want to thank them for what they did and are continuing to do. That’s what made the time we were in there go by quickly, just being able to support them.'”

Aren't people wonderful. So many step up in whatever way they can.

THE LIAR TWEETS TONIGHT

TGB's Sunday music columnist, Peter Tibbles, was the first to send this video. The Youtube page tells us that it is

...by Roy Zimmerman and The ReZisters, featuring Sandy Riccardi. Made in collaboration with the Raging Grannies of Mendocino. The Lion Sleeps Tonight words and music by Solomon Linda. Parody lyrics by Ede Morris, Roy Zimmerman, Melanie Harby.

ANIMAL SOCIAL DISTANCING

The just cracks me up. Take a look.

Blackcatssocialdistance

SeagullsSocialDistance
CatinStoreSocialDistance

There are a bunch more photos of social distancing animals at Bored Panda.

WHAT TICKS OFF VIC DIBITETTO

Enough TGB readers sent in this video that I am just going to assume no one here objects to the comedian's – uh, colorful language. Here is Vic's message to the U.S. government.

ALL YOUR PAIN IN ONE VIDEO

Thank Hank Berez for this:

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 18 April 2020

U.S. HOSPITAL SHIPS USNS MERCY AND USNS COMFORT

Here's a video about the history and operation of the two U.S. hospital ships, now in New York City and Los Angeles that are helping with coronavirus treatment. They are much older than I knew.

HERBEE THE HEDGEHOG AND AUDREE THE CAT

A German woman named Talitha Girnus posts many photo updates of her hedgehog and Bengal cat.

”...the two have become inseparable,” reports Bored Panda. “Talitha takes pictures of them against stunning backdrops as they all go on adorable adventures together. Not going to lie, their photos make me want to pack a suitcase and travel the world just like them (after the lockdown ends, of course).

“'A few months after I adopted Herbee from a girl who couldn’t keep him due to severe allergic reactions, I adopted Audree. She was three months old when I got her and she was originally already reserved for someone who wanted to breed with her. But the lady canceled on her two days before I called,' Talitha told us.”

Take a look:

Hedgehog-bengal-cat-friendship

Hedgehog-bengal-cat-friendship

More cute photos at Bored Panda and at Istagram.

A GIFT FOR OUR TIME

Someday, after COVID-19 is history, people will ask what the heck? These earrings? Why?

Tpearrings5

See and read more here.

HOW THE KITCHEN EVOLVED OVER 500 YEARS

According to Bored Panda,

”The designers of Home Advisor took the last 500 years and digitally remade the same kitchen based on the trends and/or necessities of that century. The project is called 500 years of kitchen design. Every single kitchen is unique and you can see that each century has held different standards for them.”

From the 1600s to mid-century modern (1900s), take a look at the video:

More information at Bored Panda.

OUR NEW VOCABULARY

Here is some more doggerel from reader Henry Lowenstern, this one titled, The Blame Game.

[EDITORIAL NOTE: Recently, I've mis-stated Henry's last name in some posts. It is Lowenstern, not Lowenstein. My apologies to Henry.]

The President wants everyone to know
that it was not he who was slow
to react to the coronavirus crisis.
The blame, he says, should go to
the World Health Organization (WHO),
the Obama administration
and to the governor of any state
that managed to procrastinate.
His administration, he declares, deserves and wants
plaudits for its excellent response.

WORLD WILDLIFE FUND LISTS SELF-ISOLATING ANIMALS

We humans are not the only ones who are self-isolating. Some members of the animal kingdom live that way all their lives, according to the World Wildlife Fund. As The Guardian reports:

”Occupying our oceans for more than 100m years, marine turtles are terrific navigators, in some cases swimming hundreds of thousands of miles between feeding and nesting grounds. They prefer to interact or congregate with only one other turtle for short periods for mating or nesting.

“...Once the hatchlings emerge, they will begin a long solo journey in the ocean where, if they manage to survive, they will remain alone for many years.”

MarineTurtlewwf
Photograph: Jürgen Freund/WWF

More self-isolating animals at The Guardian.

MORE ISOLATION NEWS

TGB reader, Joared, sent this with a note that she poached it from someone whose name she does not recall:

"Isolation Day 10 –
"Struck up a conversation with a Spider today. Seems nice. He's a Web Designer."

Teehee

ANOTHER NEW BOB DYLAN SONG

Bob Dylan surprised fans again on Thursday by releasing his second new song in three weeks, I Contain Multitudes. As Rolling Stone reports,

”He nods to David Bowie (rhyming 'all the young dudes' with the title phrase), Edgar Allan Poe ('Got a tell-tale heart/Like Mr. Poe/Got skeletons in the wall/Of people you know'), Irish poet Anthony Raftery’s 'The Lass From Bally-na-Lee,' and William Blake, among others.

“And occasionally, he may be intent on pure shock: 'I’m just like Anne Frank/Like Indiana Jones/And them British bad boys the Rolling Stones,' he sings.

Here is the song and you can follow the lyrics here.

More at Rolling Stone.

NEW YORK CITY: THE NEW NORMAL

Matt Chirico made this video of New York City. He explains on the Youtube page:

I felt I needed to document how much the #coronavirus has changed #NewYorkCity. New York on pause has turned the city that never sleeps into an empty and desolate city. These popular spaces, which are normally overcrowded with visitors are now left bare.

“I made this short film to capture the new tone of NYC. Please share to help slow the spread so that we can get back to our beloved city that never sleeps!

All these years since I had to leave – my god, how I miss my city.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 11 April 2020

A WILLIE NELSON WEEKEND

Personally, I can never get enough of Willie Nelson and this weekend was made for someone like me.

Today, at 8PM Eastern Daylight Time, Nelson will host At Home with Farm Aid streaming live on AXS-TV and at the Farm Aid website which will also feature Neil Young, John Mellencamp and Dave Matthews.

Willie was quoted in Rolling Stone about the live concert:

“...I’m so grateful for the farmers, ranchers and farmworkers who are on the frontlines sustaining all our communities. Now, more than ever, stay strong and positive.”

You can find out more about the live concert at the Rolling Stone and at the Farm Aid websites.

Then, on Sunday, A&E will broadcast Willie Nelson: American Outlaw, filmed during an all-star tribute concert to the Willie in Nashville in January.

A&E has released a track from the program, City of New Orleans. Here it is:

Other performers include George Strait, Jimmy Buffett, Chris Stapleton, Dave Matthews, Eric Church, Emmylou Harris, Jack Johnson, Sheryl Crow, Vince Gill, Norah Jones and the Little Willies. Find out more at Rolling Stone and A&E.

MEDICARE COVERAGE CHANGES

Medicare announced this week that it will cover (1) out-of-pocket costs for lab tests for COVID-19 and (2) all medically necessary hospitalizations.

This includes if you are diagnosed with COVID-19 and need to stay in the hospital under quarantine instead of being discharged from the hospital after an inpatient stay.

Read more at Medicare's Coronavirus page.

QUARANTINE – WASH YOUR HANDS AND STAY HOME

This came from TGB reader Joan McMullen. Jeanine Levy says on her YouTube page,

”Being quarantined from the Corona Virus takes it's emotional toll. Please enjoy my funny journey from the spice cabinet, toilet paper shortage, to melons...”

Enjoy.

JOHN OLIVER ON OAN

One America News Network (OAN) is a far right, conservative network that the president frequently mentions positively, particularly when he is angry with Fox News for lack sufficient fealty to him.

Last Sunday on his HBO program, Last Week Tonight, host John Oliver gave us his take on the network.

CHICO THE SLOTH'S PRIVATE ZOO TOUR

Most, if not all, of U.S. zoos are closed due to the virus. Texas State Aquarium took the opportunity to show its sloth, Chico, some of the denizens of the aquarium.

”As a bit of a local celebrity,” explains the YouTube page, “Chico can't tour the Aquarium on most days without being mobbed by his adoring fans. But with our temporary closing, our sleepy sloth Chico was treated to an eye-opening adventure through our Gulf of Mexico exhibits!”

Note how the dolphin, near the end, turns upside down in his tank to see Chico hanging upside down.

MORE DOGGEREL FROM HENRY LOWENSTEIN

This one titled Separation.

I used to be able to make the case
for a neighborly embrace
whenever we met,
but now, instead,
at your insistence,
I am keeping my distance,
and try to greet
you from six feet.

VP PENCE BLOCKS DRS. FAUCI AND BIRX FROM APPEARING ON CNN

As the Washington Post tells us daily, “Democracy dies in darkness” and that is what Vice President Mike Pence is doing because he doesn't like how CNN is covering the daily White House rally. CNN reports:

”Pence's office, which is responsible for booking the officials on networks during the pandemic, said it will only allow experts such as Dr. Deborah Birx or Dr. Anthony Fauci to appear on CNN if the network televises the portion of the White House briefings that includes the vice president and other coronavirus task force members...

"'When you guys cover the briefings with the health officials then you can expect them back on your air,' a Pence spokesperson told CNN.”

CNN says it cuts away from the broadcast to check the information that is often less that factual. More at CNN.

RANDY NEWMAN'S COVID-19 SONG

Like Willie Nelson, Randy Newman is also one of my favorite musicians. Randy has written a new song for our times which he recorded at home. It is titled Stay Away. You can follow the lyrics at the You Tube page.

COPYCAT PETS

Some of these are amazing. And cute too.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 4 April 2020

NEWS OF DARLENE COSTNER

Times Goes By readers who have been around here for longer than a year or so undoubtedly know Darlene Costner whose smart, witty comments have been a staple at TGB for at least 10 years.

That tapered off a few months ago and mostly disappeared as Darlene has found it difficult to use a keyboard. After all, she will be 95 years old in May.

DarleneCostner250 Within the past month, she has moved from her home in Tucson where she lived with her daughter to an adult care home in the same city. In a snailmail note to me, she told me she could no longer take care of herself and her daughter works more than full time so cannot be available to help as much as Darlene needs.

Darlene is a perfect example of online friendships – over the years, even though we never met in person, we became special friends and she has entertained me so much with her humor and taught me so much about both life in general and about growing old.

Darlene gave me permission to let readers know she has moved and is getting good care. I'm reluctant to give out her email address on the open internet (the last thing Darlene needs is more spam) nor her new street address.

So, if you would like to send her a note, card, etc., email me (you can use the “Contact” link at the top of the page) and I will sent you her email and/or street address.

THIS IS SO SILLY

So why have I watched it at least half a dozen times? A bird, a teeny-tiny skateboard and a ramp. So silly.

SOCIAL SECURITY AND THE STIMULUS PAYMENTS

Millions of Social Security beneficiaries in the United States do not file income tax returns – too little income. But when the stimulus package (CARES Act) was enacted, the public was told that to receive the $1,200 (per person) payment, they would need to file a 2018 or 2019 income tax form if they had not already done so.

Predictably and rightly so, the nation in general and many lawmakers made a lot of noise objecting and on 2 April, the government canceled that requirement.

"'Social Security recipients who are not typically required to file a tax return do not to need take an action, and will receive their payment directly to their bank account,” said Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin.”

Or by paper check if that is how they receive their Social Security payments. More at Politico.

Keep your eye on this story. The president backtracks so frequently on his own and his agency heads' announcements that nothing from the White House can be taken for certain until or unless it happens.

CLIMATE CHANGE AND COVID-19

My favorite recent tweet.

1242392595562557443-2-png__700

GOATS ROAMING STREETS OF WELSH TOWN

With billions of people around the world staying home, streets everywhere are eerily empty and local animals see an advantage. Here, some goats are playing around in the Welsh town of Llandudno:

MATCHSTICK MARVELS

The Youtube page tells us:

”Calling it 'Amazing Art with matchsticks' does not do Patrick Acton's sculptures justice. Over the past 40 years, this Iowa native has been building some of the world's biggest and complicated matchstick sculptures.

“While some of the larger ones are in Ripley's Believe it of Not Museums, many are in his own museum, 'Matchstick Marvels', down the road from his home in Gladbrook, Iowa.”

More at the Matchstick Museum website.

BRITAIN'S NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE STREAMS PLAYS

TGB reader Mary Evans Young sent this item – The National Theatre in London, according to the U.S. website TimeOut, is streaming some of their past productions for free:

”From April 2, under the banner of National Theatre at Home, every Thursday (7pm BST/2pm EST) will see a new National Theatre play released – free to watch for one week – along with bonus content including cast and creative Q&As and post-stream talks.”

Here is the initial line-up:

• April 2 One Man, Two Guvnors by Richard Bean, starring James Corden
• April 9 Jane Eyre adapted by Sally Cookson
• April 16 Treasure Island, adapted by Bryony Lavery
• April 23 Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare, starring Tamsin Greig

Read more at TimeOut and at The National Theatre website.

ANIMAL FRIENDS

This video of friendship between animals was sent by several TGB readers. Enjoy.

THE DECORAH EAGLES HAVE TWO BABIES

Remember a few weeks ago when I showed you on live cam the pair of Decorah (Iowa) bald eagles incubating their 2020 brood. Well, two chicks were born this week, a day apart on 30 and 31 March. Congratulations Mom and Dad.

There are many live animal cams from around the world at explore.org.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 28 March 2020

Today's Interesting Stuff is heavy on pandemic-related items but maybe not the kind that you're thinking of. Things they are a-changing. But first:

SAFE GROCERY SHOPPING

TGB reader Page Day sent this video of a Dr. Jeffrey VanWingen, a family physician in Michigan showing us how to clean the groceries we have bought.

Once a week, I venture out to the market and pharmacy (in the same building). My return routine is more strict than VanWingen's. One example, once I have cleaned everything I brought home outdoors, and taken it into the house, I go directly to the laundry room, undress, put all my clothes in the washer and take a shower.

I'm not convinced we need to be as strict as I am; not everyone has lungs as damaged as mine but we all need to do the best we can. Dr. VanWingen's video is a little longer than I usually run, but there are some good tips on keeping the virus out of your house off your hands and your food.

KINSA HEALTH WEATHER MAP

Kinsa is a company that makes connected smart thermometers and now they have posted a “health weather map” for the U.S. As explained on their website,

”The U.S. Health Weather Map is a visualization of seasonal illness linked to fever - specifically influenza-like illness. The aggregate, anonymized data visualized here is a product of Kinsa’s network of Smart Thermometers and the accompanying mobile applications.”

KinsaMap

The map is, of course, limited by the number of the Kinsa thermometers in use and it makes no distinction among diseases that cause fever but it may be a herlpful indicator.

Go to the website to read more and see results for your Zip Code or county.

Those are two of the serious items for you today. Now for the fun part.

Our isolation from one another is changing how we interact, and what is posted to the internet. It is only just beginning with barely a few toes in the water yet but it's easy to see that our ever-creative ways are going to flourish with expressions of our thoughts and feelings on our viral predicament. Here goes:

PATRICK STEWART'S DAILY SHAKESPEARE READING

A week ago on Friday, actor Patrick Stewart (Captain Picard of Star Trek) recorded a Shakespearean sonnet to his Twitter feed. His 3.3 million followers loved it, some saying that his voice calms their fears.

The next day Stewart posted another sonnet reading including a note explaining that his readings would continue:

You can follow Stewart's Sonnet-a-Day Twitter feed here and here.

ROTTERDAM PHILHARMONISCH ORKEST

Like so much of the world, the members of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra are in lockdown. Yet, they have found a way to play together explaining on the YouTube page:

”We’re adjusting to a new reality and we’ll have to find solutions in order to support each other. Creative forces help us, let’s think outside of the box and use innovation to keep our connection and make it work, together. Because if we do it together, we’ll succeed.”

SAN FRANCISCO IN SHUTDOWN

Peter Tibbles, who produces the Sunday Elder Music column, sent this, a drone video of locked-down San Francisco. Another friend I spoke with said that people who produce apocalyptic zombie movies are probably stockpiling enough such video for ten years worth of empty-streets video because who knows when we'll see cities this empty again.

1200 MUSEUMS

Even if we could leave home, hardly anything is open, including museums. But here, on the internet there are 1200 – count them, 1200 museums with photographs of a lot of their collections on view.

MuseumMap

Each number on the map represents the number of museums in that locale. Thank Google Arts & Culture for this. You can sort the list using the map or alphabetically. You'll find all 2,000 museums here with links to each one.

SUNDAY ELDER MUSIC

Don't forget Peter Tibble's Elder Music column tomorrow in which he continues his three-part Home series with Home Again, Home Again Jiggedy Jig, this time with a jazz theme including Nat King Cole, Bud Powell, Ella Fitzgerald, Diana Krall and more.

FIRST NEW BOB DYLAN SONG SINCE 2012

A whole lot of TGB readers came of age with 78-year-old Bob Dylan so it is news for us when he releases his first new song in eight years. It hit the internet on Thursday evening and is not about our current pandemic predicament. It is titled Murder Most Foul and as with so many of Dylan's songs, it's about much more than John F. Kennedy.

It's long, 17 minutes. You can follow along with lyrics here. You can read more about it at Rolling Stone magazine. And you can listen to it right here:

What would Interesting Stuff be without animals? We always end with animals. And they don't know anything about viruses.

STELLA THE DOG'S BEST LEAF LEAPS

Thanks to TGB reader Marcia, Stella is making her second appearance on Time Goes By. It has been four years since last time she was here and she's still loving her leaf leaping:

GREAT ANIMAL ESCAPES

I am sure I've mentioned in the past that I don't like compilation videos – they are almost always terribly edited and they leave too many questions unanswered. But this one is different. No explanations needed. Thank TGB reader Joan McMullen.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 21 March 2020

THIS MOVIE HAS BEEN RUNNING NON-STOP FOR 24 YEARS

If you ask someone in India if they’ve seen Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge or DDLJ for short, chances are you’ll get a yes. The movie is an iconic part of Indian cinema, and it’s so beloved that it has screened every day, for the past 24 years, at the Maratha Mandir theater in Mumbai.

CAN FARTS SPREAD COVID-19?

Don't laugh. I almost did but it's not necessarily a joke. As the Global Times reported:

”In a lengthy and seemingly humorous yet serious article on its WeChat account, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of Tongzhou district in Beijing clarified that farts, normally, do not constitute another transmission route of COVID-19, unless someone takes a good and rather close sniff of gas from a pantless patient.”

So as long as someone farting is wearing pants, there is no danger of transmitting the COVID-19, they say. I'm pretty sure this is not a joke. More at Mental Floss and Global Times.

TELEMEDICINE NOW PAID FOR BY MEDICARE

President Donald J. Trump announced on Tuesday that Medicare will now pay for telephone or video conferences with any physician including using such services as Skype and FaceTime.

Until now, this service had been restricted to Medicare beneficiaries in rural areas. Now, as STAT reported,

“'Medicare beneficiaries across the nation, no matter where they live, will now be able to receive a wide range of services via telehealth without ever having to leave home,' said Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

“'And these services can also be provided in a variety of settings, including nursing homes, hospital outpatient departments, and more.'”

You can read more at STAT and at TechCrunch. I am having my first telemedicine visit on Monday.

THE LAST BOOKSTORE

This is a terrific short documentary (12 minutes) by filmmaker Chad Howitt about The Last Book Store in Los Angeles and its owner, Josh Spencer.

CATS SLEEPING IN WEIRD PLACES

It's what they do. Here are some examples:

Cats-sleeping-strange-places2

Cats-sleeping-strange-places3

There are 38 more images of cats sleeping in odd places at Bored Panda.

SUNDAY ELDER MUSIC

With tomorrow's Elder Music column, Peter Tibbles begins a three-part series about home – in Sunday's case, “Home is Where the Heart Is” with music from Nina Simone, Maria Muldaur, Sam Cooke and a bunch of others. Do tune in.

REALISTIC CAKE

This is simply amazing food artistry from pastry chef Luke Vincentini. Thank TGB reader Joan McMullen for it. (If you dislike the music as much as I do, just turn down your speakers, you'll still get all the information in the captions.)

There are more videos of Vincentini's creations at YouTube.

THE MYSTERY OF RABBIT ISLAND

As the Youtube page explains:

”Okunoshima is a small island in Japan’s Inland Sea. It's called 'Rabbit Island' because of the thousands of feral rabbits that roam the land. No one knows exactly how they got there, but since the end of World War II, the rabbits have been doing what they do best...”

ONE FINE MORNING

We live in frightening times these days but I've found a small respite. With this video, we can let go of our hyper-vigilance for a few minutes, breathe deeply and relax to the magnificence of nature.

This was shot at a cyprus swamp in Florida in early January 2020.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 14 March 2020

PHOTOGRAPH OF REVOLUTIONARY WAR VETERAN

ConradHeyer1
This is Conrad Heyer. He was born in 1749 and served in the American Revolutionary War. It is believed, according to Snopes, that he is the earliest born American to be photographed.

The photograph was taken when he was 103 in 1852. You can read more at Snopes and at the Smithsonian magazine website.

CENSUS FORMS STARTED ARRIVING IN HOMES THIS WEEK

The 2020 Census in the U.S. has begun. Forms started arriving in people's mailboxes this week.

Here is how Sesame Street is explaining the Census to their young audience. A reminder for all of us.

As the YouTube page tell us: It only takes 10 minutes to support kids for the next 10 years. Call, return your form by mail, or go to the Census website.

A RESCUED STORK, HER RESCUER AND HER MATE

My friend Barbara Fisher sent this video of a relationship among two storks and a man that has lasted for more than a quarter of a century. Take a look:

Last August, Total Croatia News posted this sad update:

”Retired janitor Stjepan Vokić, who has been caring for Malena for thirty years, explained that his ''Klepo'' returned to the nest and his beloved Malena for the last time looking old, tired, and very unwell.

"'Four of them (birds) came and began making some very sad noises. I knew then that Klepo had gone, he had died. You know how they say that birds die singing,' Vokić sadly said.”

SINGING TOGETHER THROUGH A PANDEMIC

As you probably know, the entire country of Italy is in lockdown at home - no one is allowed out in the streets. In the past couple of days, quarantined Italians have been singing with one another across those empty streets and some people caught it on video. As one said, beautiful and haunting.

A SPECIAL ELDER MUSIC TOMORROW

Peter Tibbles, who has been writing the TGB Sunday music column, Elder Music, for about 10 years, has put together a different kind of post for tomorrow, Sunday.

His choices are, as always, impeccable. All selections – all in video this time - are from a worldwide organization dedicated to inspire and connect the people of the world. A whole lot of musicians – famous and not – are involved. Don't miss it.

THE LAST SETH MEYERS SHOW FOR HOW LONG?

On Thursday, Late Night with Seth Meyers made the decision - along with The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon and Late Show with Stephen Colbert - to suspend production of their shows until at least March 30th.

In Meyers' case, he and the staff had already written Thursday's “A Closer Look” segment and so they went ahead and recorded it, and posted it to YouTube. Here it is:

KAKISTOCRACY

There is no reason for this item except that I ran across the word this week. I had forgotten about it since I first saw it a year or two ago. It's fun to say: KAK-is-TOC-ra-see.

It is a term that describes rule by the stupid, ignorant, lazy and profoundly incompetent. Sound familiar?

COPENHAGEN FLASH MOB – BOLERO

People don't seem to do musical flash mobs much anymore – or any kind of flash mobs. I miss them – not that I ever saw one in person.

TGB reader Kate Gilpin sent in this one from nine years ago. I might not have posted it today except her description in the email she sent makes it a must see:

”I have always found that [this flash mob] actually brings me to tears because of the amazing sense of community it illustrates - I mean, primarily, the orchestra members and the conductor, but also the observers, who sense something remarkable happening, and stop to experience it.

“They all gradually come together, start playing their part, while the conductor modifies his movements to accommodate the growing number of players surrounding him. The drummer begins, the flute comes in, a platform appears, a baton. Just a FABULOUS experience in cooperation and love—of the music, of each other, of the project at hand.”

Now how could you resist watching after that description.

THE DECORAH EAGLES LIVE CAM

I posted this live cam about a year ago, last time the two bald eagles were awaiting the birth of their brood. There are three eggs this year. So take a peek inside this massive eagle nest in Decorah, Iowa.

You can find out more about the Decorah eagles at explore.org along with a whole lot of other live wildlife cameras from around the world.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 7 March 2020

ALEX TREBEK CANCER UPDATE

It has been a full year now since Jeopardy! host, Alex Trebek was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He took the opportunity to update everyone on his condition. Obviously, I relate.

AN ICE STORM LIKE YOU'VE NEVER SEEN

Last weekend, a mega-ice storm hit homes on the shore of Lake Erie. Take a look:

There is a full story along with a large number of breathtaking still photos of the frozen houses at Huffpost.

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME BEGINS TONIGHT

If it feels like you just turned back your clocks, you are not far off. We just did that in the U.S. on 3 November 2019, and now it's time again to turn them forward one hour tonight.

DaylightSavingsTimeMarch2020

Cell phones, computers, tablets and some other tech toys reset themselves. For some reason I have a lot of analog clocks. Grrrrrrr.

SHORTEST HARLEM GLOBETROTTER

Jahmani Swanson tells us he is 4-foot-5 but he carries himself like he's 6-foot-5.

”This basketball player, who goes by the nickname Hot Shot, plays to win. Born in the Bronx and raised in Harlem, Swanson is the shortest Harlem Globetrotter in the team’s history.

"People typically see height as the ultimate advantage in basketball. But players who underestimate Swanson because he is a little person soon regret it.”

Take a look:

A WHITE PEACOCK SHOWS OFF

TGB reader Joan McMullen sent in this idea. What can I say except Wow.

FOR BOOK LOVERS

The Booksellers is a documentary film about the New York City rare books world. The YouTube page for the trailer tells us:

”Antiquarian booksellers are part scholar, part detective and part businessperson, and their personalities and knowledge are as broad as the material they handle.

“They also play an underappreciated yet essential role in preserving history. The Bookselleers takes viewers inside their small but fascinating world, populated by an assortment of obsessives, intellects, eccentrics and dreamers.”

Here's the trailer:

There is a list of upcoming screenings at the film's website along with a contact form so you can ask when The Booksellers will show up in your town, and there is a good story about the film at The Guardian.

WIDESPREAD SOCIAL SECURITY SCAM

On Wednesday, the Inspector General of Social Security, Gail S. Ennis, issued a warning of a new tactic by government imposters to reach — and victimize — Americans by phone.

”We have received reports of text messages on cell phones that appear to come from Social Security,” said Ennis. “The texts warn about a Social Security number problem. They ask the recipient to call a number back to resolve the problem and avoid legal action.

None of this is real. It is a scam.

”We have received reports of text messages on cell phones that appear to come from Social Security. The texts warn about a Social Security number problem. They ask the recipient to call a number back to resolve the problem and avoid legal action.”

Do not believe it. Do not call the number. Find out all the information you need at the Social Security Website.

BLOOM

Too many old people live alone, don't get out much and are lonely. Some experts say loneliness is epidemic. Here is a lovely, little animated story about that.

Nadine, depressed and alone, has been living her life in the dark. A gift from a friendly neighbor gives Nadine something to live for.

WILD LIFE AT THE LOG BRIDGE

Wait until you see all the different animals that use this log bridge in a Pennsylvania forest over the course of a year. Thank TGB reader Alan Goldsmith for this.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 29 February 2020

GRETA THUNBERG AND MALALA YOUSAFZAI

In 2014, then-17-year-old Mulala Yousafzai won the Nobel Peace Prize for her education rights activism.

This year, now-17-year-old Greta Thunberg is nominated for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize for her climate change activism.

The two young women met for the first time this week in the U.K. I wonder what amazing things are they going to accomplish in their lives.

GretaAndMalala

Read more at Huffington Post.

TODAY IS LEAP DAY

February 29 happens only every four years. It's easy for Americans to remember when it occurs because it is also always a presidential election year.

Here's astrophysicist Neal DeGrasse Tyson to explain why we add a day to the calendar every fourth year.

HISTORIC FOOTAGE 1945 BATTLE OF IWO JIMA

While one of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific Theater of World War II raged on the island of Iwo Jima, 50 Marine combat cameramen operated across the island, the YouTube page tells us.

Curator Greg Wilsbacher at the University of South Carolina Libraries has been working with the U.S. Marine Corps History Division to digitize this footage. In this film, he provides commentary on some of the highlights of this newly digitized footage.

The footage was mainly intended to be used for intelligence and training, but it provides an intimate look at the battle, and also the Marines who were a part of it.

Read a lot more about the battle and film at The Conversation.

BOOKNOOKS

Booknooks are miniature inserts for book shelves that tell a story all their own. They are clever, beautiful and enchanting. Here are three samples:

Bookshelves

ItalyBookNook

JapaneseB ookNookAlley

There are a lot more at Bored Panda where I found these. And people who make booknooks have their own subreddit with a whole lot more.

JIMMY CARTER'S SOLAR PANELS

Mother Nature Network this week reported on former President Jimmy Carter's solar array in his home town of Plains, Georgia.

Carter-solar-power-plains.jpg.653x0_q80_crop-smart

”Carter, who served as the 39th U.S. president from 1977 to 1981, set aside 10 acres of farmland outside Plains in 2017 for a 1.3-megawatt (MW) solar array. Developed by SolAmerica Energy, the installation was projected to generate over 55 million kilowatt hours of clean energy in Plains — more than half the town's annual needs.

“In February 2020, SolAmerica President George Mori confirmed to People magazine that the solar farm still operates 'in its original size' and does in fact provide more than half of the town's electricity.”

Carter is not new to building solar arrays. When he was president, he had solar panels installed on the roof of the White House. Here's the video:

You can read more at Mother Nature Network.

WATER IS WEIRD, REALLY WEIRD

As the YouTube page notes, “Did you know that the water inside you has previously been inside dinosaurs, bacteria, the oceans. Science journalist Alok Jha explains why water is so incredibly weird.”

WE SURE NEED A LOT OF HOPE THESE DAY

And I've got some beautiful hope for you from my friend, Stan James. You've met him before in these pages when I featured some of his previous beach calligraphy.

This time, he did some serif writing on a San Francisco beach making a gift of hope to us all:

Stan also sent me this beach calligraphy from two years ago, done for the wedding of his friends, Kari and Manuel. The video has been recently edited and it has the further virtue of featuring my birth date in 2018:

There is more of Stan's calligraphy work at his Facebook page.

IF ZOO ANIMALS WERE RATED LIKE AMAZON REVIEWS

Recently, Bored Panda explained:

”Back in 2018, there was a glorious weekend in which several zoos took to Twitter and with the hashtag #rateaspecies, zoos, scientists, and academies of sciences all aired their thoughts on their animals in the style of an Amazon review.

“It was a wonderful animal-filled weekend and we felt it was time for it to resurface...”

Here are three examples - it's the captions that make these so much fun:

JoshsFrogs

Parrot

CatSnakeHybrid

More at Bored Panda.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 21 February 2020

THE ANTI SMARTPHONE

Justine Haupt, an engineer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, called it a "quick and dirty project" - a rotary cell phone. Here's her photo of it:

Digitalrotaryphone

It doesn't do much except make telephone calls. As Digital Trends explains:

"Some of the physical buttons on the device, for example, can be set up to link to frequently called numbers, eliminating the need for a touchscreen and menu. Just to be clear, the dialer does work, and can be used for other numbers that you don’t save."

There has been enough interest in the rotary cell phone that Haupt has decided to make it available for sale at $240. But there's a catch – at least for me: it comes as a kit you have to put it together and even supply some of the parts:

Rotary-cell-phone-kit-768x768

You can read more here and here. Justine Haupt's website is here and the purchase page is here.

TEEN TRYING TO LEARN A ROTARY PHONE

As long as we're discussing old-fashioned telephones, let's revisit a golden oldie video of two teens trying to figure out how to operate a rotary phone.

(I've never decided if I think this video is a prank – the kids just pretending – or if they really can't figure it out.)

Can you think of other things that are common to our generation that would puzzle young people?

PAPER MAPS ARE POPULAR

Google Maps, USA Today tells us, is now 15 years old. Continuing on a theme here, they also tell us that not everyone has given up paper street maps in favor electronic ones with GPS directions.

State-Side-CA-Road-Map

“'Do they still make, even sell, paper maps?' That question from retired New York marketing executive Michael Lissauer is emblematic of our daily reliance on digital navigation. 'Other than in a history class, Europe before World War II, who needs a paper map?'

“It may surprise Lissauer and others that the answer to the question is yes. They're actually on the rise. U.S. sales of print maps and road atlases had have had a five-year compound annual growth rate of 10%, according to the NPD BookScan. For context, in 2019, the travel maps and atlases category sold 666,000 units, with year-over-year sales up 7%.”

Plus, maps are fun to read. More about this trend at USA Today.

PINK THE BORDER COLLIE COLLECTS THIRD WIN IN A ROW

Pink is amazing. For the third year in a row at the Westminster Dog Show this month in New York, the border collie won her class in the agility competition. In under 30 seconds. Wait till you see this – what an athlete:

NEW TAX FORM JUST FOR OLD PEOPLE

It's called 1040-SR and it is only for people age 65 or older.

1040SRForm

Here is some of what Richard Eisenberg at Next Avenue says about it:

This new 24-line, two-page form was devised by Congress in 2018, with a push from AARP and others, to make tax filing a little easier for older Americans. Those taxpayers couldn’t use the previous simplified 1040-EZ because it lacked lines for Social Security benefits or Individual Retirement Account distributions...

“You can fill out the 1040-SR regardless of your filing status or whether you itemize or claim the standard deduction, as long as you were 65 or older in 2019 — or if you were married filing jointly, at least one of you was.

“If you will itemize and file the 1040-SR, you’ll need to fill out Schedule A, Itemized Deductions.

“Interestingly, the 1040-SR is tied to your age, not whether you’re retired...If you’re over sixty-five and still working, you can use it. And if you’re retired and under sixty-five, you can’t.

Of COURSE it's more complicated than the snippet I've quoted (after all, it's from the IRS) but Next Avenue does a decent job of explaining.

WHAT HAPPENS TO UNCLAIMED AIRLINE BAGGAGE

Unclaimed baggage goes to the Unclaimed Baggage Center in Scottsboro, Alabama. It is the only store in America that buys and resells unclaimed baggage from the airline industry.

Here are some of what happens behind the scenes and some of the strange items that get left behind.

HOW THE AMISH USE TECHNOLOGY

The Washington Post last week published a too-short, interesting story about how the Amish use technology. That they do so at all was a surprise to me (but what do I know).

”When a church member asks to use a new technology, the families discuss the idea and vote to accept or reject. The conversation centers on how a device will strengthen or weaken relationships within the community and within families....

“Friends of mine belonged to an Amish church in Michigan. One of the church members wanted to purchase a hay baler that promised to be more efficient, even as it enabled him to work alone.

“The members discussed the proposal — yes, the new machine might increase productivity, but how would community connections be affected if he began haying without the help of others, and what would happen if his neighbors adopted the same technology?

“The risk to social cohesion, they decided, wasn’t worth the potential gains.”

More at the Washington Post.

OUR STUNNINGLY BEAUTIFUL PALE BLUE DOT

This short video was published to YouTube on Valentine's Day by National Geographic in celebration of the 30 years since that gorgeous photograph was made.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 15 February 2020

TIME GOES BY DONATION WEEK REMINDER
Yes, we are almost finished – this is day six of the TGB annual donation drive to help support the costs of maintaining Time Goes By. You can read the details on last Monday's post.

Whether you donate or not, nothing changes here. TGB will always remain advertising-free with never a membership fee or paid firewall. If you would like to help support the work that goes on here, click the button below. If not, which is perfectly fine, scroll down for today's Interesting Stuff.

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BUZZ AND THE DANDELIONS

Let's start the list today with a great good laugh. Who can resist a laughing baby.

WAIT TILL YOU SEE THESE BABIES

Meerkats this time, born at the Miami zoo.

Meerkat1

The Bored Panda website tells us:

”Squirrel-sized meerkats are mongooses, widely known for their upright posture. They often stand on their rear legs, scanning the areas over the southern African plains where they live.

Meerkat2

Meerkat3

Many more of the meerkat family at Bored Panda.

JOAQUIN PHOENIX OSCAR ACCEPTANCE SPEECH

There was a time when almost every year at the Oscar ceremonies, several Hollyiwood stars would speak up for political or humanitarian causes in their acceptance speeches.

That doesn't happen much anymore but last Sunday actor Joaquin Phoenix spoke and it is worth a listen.

HEAR CHAUCER IN THE ORIGINAL 14TH CENTURY ENGLISH

As Mental Floss explains, a team of researchers has created an app that reads Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century masterpiece, The Canterbury Tales in the Middle English in which it was written.

”The app includes a 45-minute narration of the 'General Prologue,' and the researchers have plans for at least two more apps, which will focus on The Miller’s Tale and other stories.

“If you’re not exactly well-versed in Middle English, don’t worry—the app also contains a line-by-line modern translation of the text, so you can follow along as you listen.”

What surprised me is that I can (and you will, too) understand parts of what is being read – parts where the English hasn't changed much.

One of the contributors to the project was Monty Python member Terry Jones who was – surprise to me – a medievalist.

"[His] two books on Chaucer and translation of the 'General Prologue' are featured in the app’s introduction and notes. Jones passed away on January 21, 2020, and this was one of the last academic projects he worked on.”

There is more information at Mental Floss. You can download the app at Google Play and iTunes. Or you can just go listen to it at the online desktop app like I did.

TYPEWRITER ART

The artist, James Cook, tells us on the YouTube page that these are various scenes around the Essex countryside in December 2019.

”The three 'typicitions' were partly-drawn from observation. I spent no more than 3 hours at each location and completed these drawings indoors (where it was nice and warm.) These drawings were typed on my 71" Adler Tippa and 56" Oliver Courier typewriter.

LO-O-O-O-O-O-NG CATS

I once had a really long cat but I think most of these are longer. Take a look:

Longcat1

Longcat2

LongCat3

More at Bored Panda.

”THE DAY DEMOCRACY DIED” SUNG BY THE FOUNDING FATHERS

So many of you sent this video that I almost stopped opening my email program this week. Featured in order of appearance are: George Washington, John Adams, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay – to the tune of American Pie.

HAIR LOVE

This short animated film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time.

The film won the Best Animated Short at the Oscars this year. Thank my friend Jim Stone for sending it to us.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 8 February 2020

IAN McLELLAN IMPRESSION OF MAGGIE SMITH

This is Oscars weekend and I managed to dig up this marvelously funny Oscar-related clip from The Graham Norton Show in 2017.

Patrick Stewart (check out his socks) and Ian McLellan are the guests. McLellan, who played Gandolf in the Lord of the Rings films, does a pitch-perfect impression of Maggie Smith (Professor Minerva McGonagall in the Harry Potter movies) when he ran into her at an Oscar ceremony.

This year's Oscar show will air on ABC-TV on Sunday at 8PM eastern U.S. time.

WHAT THE PRESIDENT TWEETED AFTER THE ACQUITTAL VOTE IN THE SENATE

Terrifying that a president does this:

MANUFACTURING HUGE PAPER LANTERNS IN CHINA

Due to the virus outbreak, China canceled a lot of lunar New Year celebrations. Here's a story about the traditional lanterns – huge ones – made in a small Chinese Village.

WHAT IF BEING AN OLDER CUSTOMER...

...were as hard as finding a job after age 40?

More at AARP.

DOOMSDAY CLOCK MOVES CLOSER TO MIDNIGHT

Actually, not just closer, but closer than it has ever been – moved up 20 seconds to 100 seconds to midnight from two minutes to midnight.

"The decision was made by the group’s science and security board, in consultations with its board of sponsors, which includes 13 Nobel laureates...

"In a statement accompanying the clock’s advance, the organization said the nuclear and climate dangers 'are compounded by a threat multiplier, cyber-enabled information warfare that undercuts society’s ability to respond.'

"'The international security situation is dire, not just because these threats exist, but because world leaders have allowed the international political infrastructure for managing them to erode,' it said."

There is more to read at AP.

FRESH GUACAMOLE

This short film was a 2013 Oscar nominee and has been viewed on YouTube more than 180,000,000 times. It's the shortest film ever nominated. Produced by PES.

(There are two other short films in the same vein – sequels - linked at the end of the video. They are clever too but this one, the original, is the best.)

REAL ID

Beginning 1 October, 2020, if you plan to use your state-issued ID or license to fly within the United States, make sure it is REAL ID compliant. If you are not sure if your ID complies with REAL ID, check with your state department of motor vehicles.

Here is a video about it.

There is more information at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) webpage and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) website.

SLANG FROM THE AMERICAN COLONIAL PERIOD

That period in U.S. history ran from 1607 when America was just a group of British colonies to the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The settlers brought the English language with them and Mental Floss provides us with 15 slang terms from that period.

Here are three to get you started.

KEDGE
When someone asked how you were doing, you might have replied, “I’m pretty kedge.” It’s a bizarre but wonderful term that essentially means being in good health.

CIRCUMBENDIBUS
From 1681 something unnecessarily roundabout - like someone telling a rambling story or taking a weird road when driving somewhere,

TWISTICAL
Unfair or immoral – primarily used in New England.

There are 12 more at Mental Floss.

KITTENS IN THE BOOK SHOP

Kittens! And lots of them! Playing around and napping among the books. And probably reading Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat when no one’s looking.

The best part is, you can adopt any of the cats in the bookstore and give them the forever home they deserve. Cats, coffee, and books. Does it get any better than that?

The kitties are at Otis & Clementine’s Books and Coffee, Halifax, Nova Scotia and so far, there is a 100 percent adoption rate. Here are three of them. Well, three photos, but more cats than that.

OtisClementsBooksCat3

OtisClementsBooksCat1

OtisClementsBooksCat2

More kitty book shop photos at Bored Panda.

* * *

Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 1 February 2020

TOMORROW IS GROUNDHOG DAY

Tomorrow in the U.S., Punxatawny Phil will emerge from his burrow and let us know if we will have another six weeks of winter. Why is it, do you think, that a groundhog knows all about winter's length? Here's a video:

ONLOOKERS FREE PEDESTRIAN FROM UNDER CAR

In downtown Manhattan last week, passersby freed a pedestrian trapped under an SUV. Another passerby caught it all on camera and posted the video to Twitter.

Hurray for the rescuers.

MTN DEW AS GOOD AS THE ORIGINAL

Yes, it is a commercial for Mtn Dew but it is a hoot to watch actor Bryan Cranston recreate the “Here's Johnny” scene from the film, The Shining.

EFFORTLESS COMPETENCE

Yes, another commercial but wait until you see this. It's for Brylcreem and it's old – released in 2009. What's amazing is that it was shot in one take, no edits and I cannot image what went in to getting it done.

Somewhere I read that it took 605 takes. I don't know if any human could stand to do that whole thing more than 600 times but whatever time it took, I sure enjoyed watching it.

50 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT BUBBLE WRAP

Here is a sampling of three:

In December 2015, security officials were called to the Kirtland Air Force base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, after reports of gunshots were heard. High-powered weapons and Humvees were assembled before officials determined that the “threat” had been someone on base popping Bubble Wrap.

Popping Bubble Wrap ranks among life’s greatest small pleasures...In 1992, psychology professor Kathleen Dillon conducted a study in which she found that subjects were more relaxed and less tired after a popping session. One possible reason: Humans are soothed by tactile sensations of touch, which is why some cultures favor smooth stones or "worry beads" to manipulate for comfort.

In 2004, the Museum of Modern Art accepted a donation from Sealed Air of a nearly 12-inch by 12-inch square of Bubble Wrap into their Architecture and Design collection. It went on display as part of their Humble Masterpieces collection, which also featured chopsticks and the Band-Aid.

You can read the other 47 things to know about Bubble Wrap at Mental Floss.

AMERIQUEST “DON'T JUDGE TOO QUICKLY” COMMERCIALS

This is another commercial – well, a whole bunch of them, a compilation that is laugh-out-loud- or cringe-worthy.

MONGOOSE VERSUS FOUR LIONS

Everybody loves an underdog. Take a look at this little guy.

PSILOCYBEN AND CANCER

A new study published this week found that five years after taking psilocyben, 80 percent of cancer patients were still experiencing improvement from cancer-related depression and anxiety. Here a video about one study participant:

You can read more at NBC News.

PANDAS PLAYING ON A SLIDE

I'm pretty sure I've posted this video before but it's still cute and fun.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 25 January 2020

BEING 97

In a film by his grandson, 97-year-old philosopher, Herbert Fingarette, faces in own death and realizes he has changed his mind since he wrote his book about about death published in 1996.

In that book, he argued that fearing ones own death is irrational:

”When you die, he wrote, 'there is nothing.' Why should we fear the absence of being when we won’t be there ourselves to suffer it?”

At 18 minutes, the video is longer that I usually like to publish at Interesting Stuff but I think this is worth it. You can also read a bit more about it at The Atlantic.

THE WORLD'S LARGEST CRUISE SHIP COOKS 30,000 MEALS PER DAY

I've never once been tempted to take a cruise but I liked this short video about what it takes to serve so many meals. In it, the narrator reports that guests eat EIGHT times a day, and never explains it.

Oh well. The rest of the information is astounding.

THE SHAKESPEARIAN INSULT KIT

You dankish, boil-brained canker blossom. How's that for putting some jerk in his/her place? It's way better than the F-word too many of us fall back on.

Now, thanks to TGB reader, Joan McMullen, we have the Shakespearean Insult Kit in which you choose a phrase from each of three columns and let fly.

Give it a whirl – it's a load of fun even if, like me, you don't know what a lot of the words mean.

ShakespeareanInsultChart

THE UNUSUAL ITALIAN VILLAGE IN WALES

As the Youtube pages tells us:

”Tucked away on the coast of northern Wales is the village of Portmeirion, a truly unique town built with a colorful, whimsical design and an eye for conservation.

“Built between 1925 and 1975 by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, Portmeirion became a home for lost building parts, such as taking the stones of a demolished castle to make a town clock tower.

“But the most striking part of the town is the integration of nature with the town's colorful architecture, modifying nearly every single building to work with the nearby terrain.”

A BOATLOAD OF SNOW IN CANADA

In Canada last weekend, they got a megamonster snowstorm. Bored Panda posted a big bunch of photographs of the snow like you've probably never seen before. Fortunately, these Canadians have sense of humor.

CanadianSnowMeasureingSnow

CanadianSnowDinosaur

CanadaSnowHousescovered

A whole lot more photos at Bored Panda.

HOW MUCH WARMER WAS YOUR CITY LAST YEAR?

The New York Times tells us:

”Scientists announced that 2019 was the second-warmest year on record. In a database of more than 3,500 cities compiled by AccuWeather, about 83 percent saw average temperatures higher than normal last year.

New York City was .07 degrees F warmer than 2018. Washington, D.C.: 2.4 degrees F above 2018. Seattle, Washingnton: 1.1 degree F above 2018.

Check your American city at The New York Times.

CAT FIGHTS OFF THREE COYOTES

Max is one badass cat. Take a look at his owner's security cam footage:

WE SOLVED PARALLEL PARKING 93 YEARS AGO

...and then, apparently, forgot about it. Take a look at how it was done with this car in Paris in 1927.

PATROL DOGS OF JACKSON HOLE

The Youtube page tells us

”The Jackson Hole Patrol Dogs are the hardest working canines in the valley. Day in and day out they work alongside ski patrol practicing search and rescue techniques.

“More than just members of the patrol, these dogs are family members of the patrolers who take care of them.”

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 18 January 2020

SOME SOLEMNITY IS IN ORDER

Let's take a moment to acknowledge that we in the United States took on a historic and solemn civic event this week, the impeachment trial of President Donald John Trump.

On Thursday, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Roberts, swore in all the Senate members with a special oath just for impeachment trials. Here is the moment:

“...you will do impartial justice” is the key phrase the senators swore to. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has stated publicly for many weeks that he will not be impartial, that he is coordinating the president's defense with the White House.

Did you know there is no penalty for not doing impartial justice? I didn't until now. So the point of taking an oath is...?

TWINS BORN IN DIFFERENT DECADES

Well, isn't this fun. The Indy Channel, in Indiana, tells us

”Joslyn Grace Guilen Tello was born at 11:37 p.m. on December 31, 2019 at Ascension St. Vincent Carmel and her twin brother, Jaxon DeWayne Mills Tello, was born at 12:07 a.m. on January 1, 2020.”

Let's go to the video tape:

And for the rest of their lives, the twins will be explaining their separate birthdays.

SAVING HELLBENDERS

I'll bet you never heard of this endangered animal before. It has a few more scary or icky names, devil dog, snot otter and lasagna lizard. The YouTube page tells us it

”...is one of the largest salamanders on Earth, growing to nearly 2 feet in length. Sadly, humans have been tampering with their natural habitat, and hellbenders are disappearing from streams in the Cherokee National Forest. Nolan, along with a team of researchers at Tennessee State University, are working on relocating the hellbenders to new streams.

If they weren't so slimy, they'd be cute little buggers.

A TINY WELSH TOWN WITH LOTS OF BOOKSHOPS

The YouTube page tells us that

”Hay-on-Wye was once declared an independent kingdom of books by the man who appointed himself its king. The United Kingdom's mecca for bibliophiles is less than one square mile in size, but it’s packed with independent booksellers curating all kinds of used and antique reading material.

“Today, the area doesn't just provide a safe haven for books—the books actually help to preserve their home.”

THE 10 MOST CHECKED-OUT BOOKS FROM THE NYC PUBLIC LIBRARY

While we are talking about books, here's an interesting item. The New York Public Library, the largest library system in the United States, just issued its list of the most checked-out books during its 125 years of existence. Here are the top three:

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (485,583 checkouts)
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss (469,650)
1984 by George Orwell (441,770)

It would be interesting to know how many of those 441,770 checkouts for 1984 have happened since The Trump administration began.

See the rest of the list along with commentary and some other information at The New York Times or the Washington Post.

WORLD'S BIGGEST SUSHI

And the smallest too. Take a look at this video about Hiromu Inagaki, who serves super-sized sushi at the Umewaka Restaurant in Anjo City, Japan.

CAT REVENGE

Anyone who hangs out with cats knows something about this kind of behavior. As a member of the cat's staff labeled the photo, “Locked My Cat In The Bathroom While I Made A Meal Because He Was Being - - - Annoying. Revenge Was Had.”

Cat Revenge

There are 49 more petty revenge examples at Bored Panda – not all it is about cats.

IF SINGULAR THEY BECOMES STANDARD...

After the lively discussion pro and con on Monday's post about the new-ish use of the pronoun “they” and its derivatives in the singular, I couldn't resist this.

Because I run this joint on the web and can do what I want with it, here is a marvelously funny comment from TGB reader George Gates that beautifully illustrates how confusing, obfuscating and messy this new usage can (and undoubtedly will) be.

”My university professional son recently asked me, as they periodically does, to edit their updated resume and cover letter. They were replete with them's, their's and they's in reference to singular antecedents.

“When I corrected them for them, they objected and politely educated their dad that they was out of step with their emerging norms in their university environment there. They was adamant about them.

“Not wishing to seem obtuse, I acceded to them and left them there as they had been written by them. They was happier that their language-stickler dad had seen the error of their outdated ways, and appreciated them for their openmindedness, thanking them then and there.

“They were relieved by their son's understanding and patience with their ignorance. Also flabbergasted, gobsmacked and discombobulated (all sadly underused words!) by the entire experience.”

PEOPLE VERSUS WINTER

During four winters in Maine, I personally experienced several of these person-versus-winter mishaps. You may have done so too.

In the six years since it was posted to YouTube, the video has racked up more than 11 million views.

A PENGUIN'S LEAP OF FAITH

She (he?) is brave, resourceful and cute.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 11 January 2020

A 1974 COMPUTER PREDICTION

Forty-five years ago, science fiction writer, Arthur C. Clarke, made “the bold claim that one day computers would allow people to work from home and access their banking records.”

Take a look at this 1974 news story about that.

DON'T CALL OUR COUNTRY HOLLAND ANYMORE

The Netherlands began the new decade by announcing that the country be called The Netherlands, not Holland:

”The Netherlands actually consists of 12 provinces, two of which combined make up Holland, so referring to the Netherlands as a whole as Holland is just wrong,” reports Business Insider.

“The rebrand hopes to manage Amsterdam's over-tourism, which has already been addressed by the country in the form of a ban on guided tours of the Red-Light District, as well as the removal of the famous 'I amsterdam' sign.”

Read more at Business Insider and at Mental Floss.

HOW WOLVES CHANGE RIVERS

As the Vimeo page explains,

”When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred.

“What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.”

NOTORIOUS RBG SAYS SHE IS CANCER FREE

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced last week that after treatment for a recurrence of pancreatic cancer, she is now cancer free:

”The 86-year-old justice, one of the oldest to serve on the Supreme Court, offered the health update to CNN in an interview in her chambers Tuesday evening.

“'I’m cancer free. That’s good,' Ginsburg said, with CNN reporting that she was 'sounding energized and speaking animatedly.'

"Ginsburg’s intensive radiation treatment for a malignant tumor on her pancreas in August had followed a diagnosis of lung cancer at the end of 2018 that resulted in the removal of part of her left lung and forced her to miss oral arguments for the first time in 25 years on the bench.”

You can read more at the Washington Post.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A NERD AND A GEEK

According to the YouTube page,

”Don McMillan is an engineer and a comedian so he has the brains to utilize fancy charts and graphs to make his point. He makes some good points about the everyday technology that we use like printer ink and usb devices.”

And I laughed out loud. You probably will too.

There is more comedy from Don McMillan at his YouTube page.

THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM IS 150 YEARS OLD

2020 marks 150 years since the Metropolitan Museum in New York City opened its doors. Not to take anything away from other marvelous museums, The Met was one of my most favorite places in the city over the 40 years I lived there.

The Youtube page tells us that the anniversary will be celebrated

”...throughout 2020 with exhibitions, events, and new ways to connect with art. Highlights include Making The Met, 1870–2020, the reimagined British Galleries, and a three-day celebration in June.”

Here are three people – a Museum employee, fashion guru Tim Gunn and a ballet dancer – on what The Met means to each of them:

The Met's website is one of the best on the web. You'll find it here.

UPS DOGS

I love this story – about social media pages where UPS drivers throughout the world post photographs of the dogs (and some other animals) they meet on their delivery rounds.

In Olympia, Washington:

UPSdogsOlympia

In Louisville, Kentucky:

UPSLouisville

In Ottawa, Canada:

UPSOttawaCanada

There are many more photos at Bored Panda and, of course, at Facebook and Instagram.

DAVID ZINN – CHALK ARTIST

David Zinn (not to be confused with the costume and set designer of the same name), has been delighting people in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for many years.

The are quite a few good chalk artists on the internet, those clever folks who make it look like you're about to fall into a chasm if you take one more step forward on the sidewalk.

Zinn can do that too, but his work usually involves funny little characters and a sense of whimsy I haven't see before. Take a look:

Lordy, it must be fun to walk around Ann Arbor.

There are many examples of his work online – video and still photos: Try this YouTube link or his Zinnart website, Facebook or Instagram. Or just google his name.

Thank TGB reader Joan McMullen for this.

THE SQUIRREL SNOW REMOVAL SERVICE

Now if only a squad of them could be trained to do the driveway.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 4 January 2020

PIPER, THE AVIATION BIRD DOG

Let's have the YouTube page do the intro:

”Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, cooler than a cucumber in a bowl of hot sauce, it’s Piper the Aviation Bird Dog, ready for duty.

“Alongside his handler Brian Edwards, the dynamic duo protects the planes at Cherry Capital Airport from bird strikes. Birds can pose a huge threat to flight safety, but when they see Piper on his way, geese, ducks and gulls flee the runways.

“It’s an important job, but not one without its share of fun.”

I'm pretty sure I've featured a different aviation bird dog before. Maybe dogs working at airports is a larger phenomenon that I knew. And look at Piper's cool sunglasses.

O ENCONTRO DE QUINTA FEIRA

That title is Portuguese for The Thursday Meeting (according to Google Translate). I don't know what that has to do with the film but it doesn't matter – just enjoy the story. The film maker is only 20 years old.

Thank my friend Jim Stone for sending this.

TRAIN PLOWING THROUGH DEEP SNOW IN JAPAN

Wow, is all I can say.

ORGANIZED CRIME

I'm not convinced it is the best cartoon of the century but it certainly is a cartoon for our time. Thank TGB reader Joan McMullen.

CartoonOrgCrime

HOW TREES COMMUNICATE

With the burning of the Amazon, Australia and deforestation in general, increasing numbers of writers are telling us just how amazing trees are. Here is one short version of one thing they do.

RIDE ME BACK HOME

Peter Tibbles is the proprietor of the music section of this blog whose column appears here every Sunday. But sometimes I drop in a music video or two.

This is a mini-documentary from Willie Nelson. I never tire of his warm, cozy voice and his gentle urging of us to do the right thing.

LIMITING OUR CHOICES

Reporter Geoffrey A. Fowler wrote an end-of-decade overview of tech changes during the past 10 years.

He says there were no break-out new products during this period like the iPad and Walkman in the past but our relationship with our various screens got stronger and we became more dependent on them.

Fowler enumerates these changes some of which were probably not good for us and mankind. Like this one:

“The voice assistants Alexa, Siri and rival Google Assistant also helped make us comfortable with the idea there is just one answer to a question. Remember when searching for information required sorting through Google links? Now a tech giant gets to decide.”

If you think about that in regard to small children who don't know it's not necessarily true that there is only one answer to a question, it is worrisome. You can read all the rest – good and not so good – that Fowler has rounded up at the Washington Post.

ANDREAS WANNERSTEDT'S “ODDLY SATISFYING VOLUME 5

Reader Joan McMullen sent this item too. I've featured designer Andreas Wannerstedt in the past and his work is always mesmerizing. Each of the items in today's video is “based upon the idea to trigger some kind of odd satisfaction and that inexplicable feeling we all know,” he says.

If you want to see more of Wannerstedt's work, just google his name. He's all over the web.

NEVER GIVE UP

Little mouse. Big cracker. Persistence.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.


INTERESTING STUFF – 28 December 2019

RAM DASS DIES AT 88

Lost amid Christmas hubbub and never-ending Trump chaos, was the death of Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert) last Sunday at his home in Maui, Hawaii.

He started out as a Harvard professor, shared 1960s fame promoting psychedelics with fellow Harvard professor Timothy Leary and after a trip to India, spent the rest of his life as spiritual leader beloved by millions.

In September, a biographical film, Becoming Nobody, was released. Here is the theatrical trailer:

The film will become available on DVD on 20 January 2020 here. His many books are available at most of the usual places.

I met Ram Dass once, briefly, in the 1970s, and greatly respect him. There are a bunch of good obituaries online. Here are three of them:

New York Times
Huffington Post
Rolling Stone

POLAR BEAR TWINS WITH MAMA

A couple of polar bear cubs rolling around in the the snow and crawling all over mama on a cold winter's day.

MAKE EARTH COOL AGAIN

Take a look at this guy's hat – I want one:

SteveGhanHat

Steve Ghan is a climate scientist. Here's what The Los Angeles Times says about him:

”He spent 28 years at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., building the complex climate models that — together with many other lines of evidence — helped confirm humanity’s role in warming the planet. Advocacy was not part of his portfolio.

“'We naively thought, Well, OK, we’ve done our job, now the politicians are going to make decisions,’ he said. 'But that’s not the way it worked.'

“So Ghan bucked tradition and began speaking publicly about the risks of climate change. And these days, more and more scientists are making the same choice.

“They are rejecting the idea that researchers should stick to the data and let others figure out what to do with it. Driven by the lack of climate action, they are marching in the streets, signing on to manifestos and even getting arrested — all in the name of avoiding the worst effects of global warming.”

The thing is, I really want one of those hats. I think every one of us who understands that climate change is anything but the hoax the president says it is should wear one of these blue hats. Imagine if they became an ubiquitous as those red hats. I wish I knew where to get one.

Your can read more – and please do – at The Los Angeles Times.

HAND ART

Or, as it is also called, handimals. TGB reader and Reader Story contributor Jack Handley sent this item and wait until you see what he is talking about.

The artist is Guido Daniele of Milan, Italy. (Just hit the pause button on your browser if you want more time with an image):

There is a lot more about Mr. Daniele at his website and still images of more handimals here.

WHY DON'T CHOCOLATE CHIPS MELT IN THE OVEN

Good question. Here is part of what Mental Floss tells us:

”Unlike baking chocolate, chocolate chips differ in that they tend to have a lower amount of cocoa butter, which makes them more resistant to heat. Some chips also have stabilizers and emulsifiers like soy lecithin to help them maintain their shape—the chips are essentially engineered to resist attempts to turn them into liquid.

“Chips like Nestlé's Morsels do, in fact, melt when baked. But because the cookie dough has firmed up around them, the chips retain their shape. After the cookie has cooled, the chocolate solidifies once more, giving the appearance of a chip that has been unaffected by the heat.”

There is more detail and some background on chocolate chip cookies at Mental Floss.

PRONOUNCING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

People who learn English as a second language often complain about confusing way it is spelled and pronounced.

A Dutch writer, traveler and educator named Dr. Gerard Nolst Trenité took the pronunciation complaint seriously and wrote a poem titled The Chaos about it. Mental Floss (again) explains:

“...a poem written in 1920 perfectly encapsulates the baffling nature of English. In fact, it's so tricky that even native English speakers with college degrees may struggle to get through it without botching a word...

“It starts out easy, then gets progressively harder.”

You can follow along in this video:

There is an even longer version written by The English Spelling Society published in 1990s – 274 lines compared to the original 146 lines in the video. You can read that here [pdf] – sorry, no audio or video that I can find.

More information at Mental Floss.

CATS IN SNOW FOR THE FIRST TIME

Apparently the weather this weekend on the east coast of the United States is more like spring than winter. On the other side of the world, Australia is suffering horribly with the hottest temperatures on record and accompanying wild fires.

Here is something to cool off to from TGB reader Cathy Johnson. (I found the music really annoying so I hit the mute button.)

MAKING FRIENDS

I promise this is the last Christmas video of the season but it could take place at any time of the year. It's a bit treacly for my taste but I like it anyway.

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Interesting Stuff is a weekly listing of short takes and links to web items that have caught my attention; some related to aging and some not, some useful and others just for fun.

You are all encouraged to submit items for inclusion. Just click “Contact” at the top of any Time Goes By page to send them. I'm sorry that I won't have time to acknowledge receipt and there is no guarantee of publication. But when I do include them, you will be credited and I will link to your blog.